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2021 Vote Explanations
RELEASE|March 25, 2021
Contact: John Reilly
Roll CallBillDateExp.
1Election of Speaker13-JanI proudly voted yes to elect Jason Wentworth as Speaker of the Michigan House of Representatives. Speaker Wentworth is an exceptional leader who will do what is right for our State. I look forward to working with him over these next two years. Speaker Wentworth was elected unanimously.
2Speaker Pro-Tempore13-JanI voted yes to elect Representative Hornberger as Speaker Pro-Tempore of the Michigan House of Representatives. It has been a pleasure to serve with Representative Hornberger on the education committee these past 4 years. We have always worked well together and share many common goals. Speaker Pro-Tempore Hornberger was elected unanimously.
3Election of Clerk13-JanI voted yes to elect Gary Randall as the Clerk of the House. Clerk Randall is more than just the clerk. He has been an integral part of the House of Representatives for many years. Clerk Randall is retiring later this year and we will dearly miss his service. Clerk Randall was elected unanimously.
4,5,6,7HB 4019, 4047-40494-FebI voted yes on the House supplemental budget plan for COVID relief. Although I do not support all of the plan, and wish to see changes in the future, the legislature is ready and willing to get to work for the residents of our State. Here is what the plan includes: “Help afflicted job providers and their families •$150 million deposit into the unemployment trust fund ensures benefits for unemployed workers continue and helps offset the cost of fraudulent claims paid due to a lack of oversight from the Whitmer administration. •$55 million to ensure relief for local Michigan job providers currently facing higher unemployment system contribution costs. •$415 million to help restaurants and other small businesses who lost revenue because of the governor’s severe and arbitrary COVID restrictions. •$38.5 million to reimburse fees for liquor licenses and health department inspections as local businesses struggle to reopen. •$22 million to assist job providers facing penalties and interest on 2020 summer or winter property taxes. •$165 million to help families with rent and utility relief. •$510 million for Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) benefits for families facing hunger. More funding is expected to follow. Get kids back in school •$363 million for districts committing to reopen in-person instruction by Feb. 15. All $1.65 billion in federal Title I funds would be allocated, and $12 million would cover benchmark assessments. The state could not shut down in-person instruction or sports activities, but local districts and local health departments could do so when appropriate based on COVID metrics. •$135 million for a voluntary, in-person summer semester for K-8 to help kids recover from learning loss during the pandemic, plus a credit recovery option for high school students. An additional $15 million helps districts launch before-and-after school programs. •$21 million for teachers and support staff helping students catch up on learning over the summer. •$5.8 million to help families participating in summer school offset transportation, tutoring and other costs. Fix the governor’s broken vaccine rollout •$22 million quarterly for closer monitoring and accountability in the governor’s troubled distribution plan. The state could not impose vaccination mandates. •$144 million for virus testing would be allocated quarterly, to improve oversight and efficiency. Total Cost: About $3.5 billion in federal and state funding” The plan passed 59-50, 60-49, 57-51, & 56-52.
8SB 3011-FebI voted yes on SB 30, which renames a portion of I-94 as the Firefighter Coleman A. Tate Memorial Highway. Firefighter Tate died in the line of duty during a fire in 1981. His son, Joe Tate, is a current colleague in the House of Representative. The bill passed unanimously.
9,10,11HB 4018, 4020, 402118-FebI voted yes on House Bill’s 4018, 4020, and 4021. The bills are vehicle bills which can be used to craft future omnibus supplementals. The bills passed unanimously.
12HB 412623-FebI voted yes on HB 4126, which is a technical fix to the pheasant stamp program. The legislation would align the fees retained by authorized retailers with already established hunting and fishing licenses. The bill passed unanimously.
13HJR A24-FebI voted yes on HJR A, which amends the State Constitution to require a two-thirds vote for passage of a bill during lame duck. HJR A puts a stop to last-minute, late night partisan deal making after an election. Ethics reform is a top priority for this Legislature, and that’s why we are making it one of the first issue we address. The joint resolution passed 102-7.
14HB 401524-FebI voted no on HB 4015, which would require third-party websites to disclose that they are not a state agency. The legislation comes from a place of concern and care, but there is not much of a problem to solve. The legislation is based off a constituent who used a third-party website to renew their license, and therefore, paid unnecessary fees. However, any google search for state business, specifically for license renewal, will feature top links to the SOS affiliated website. It is very difficult to find a non-SOS site that directly allows you to renew your license. Many websites simply provide a link or information to the SOS page. Furthermore, state websites have a .gov address as opposed to .com address. Lastly, I did find one site that allowed for state transactions to take place and it already had numerous disclaimers that it was not an official state site. The bill passed 102-7.
15HB 424725-FebI voted yes on HB 4247, which modifies tuition assistance benefits for certain survivors of Michigan police and fire fighters killed in the line of duty. The Police Officer’s and Fire Fighter’s Survivor Tuition Act (STG) uses a formula for any tuition awards. This bill removes many arbitrary guidelines to ensure the process is simpler. The bill passed unanimously.
16, 17HB 4043-40442-MarI voted yes on HB 4043 & 4044, which requires state operated registries of psych beds, crisis beds, and substance disorder beds, to report data to the Michigan Crisis and Access Line. This package will increase transparency between state programs, and make coordinating access for those who need beds more efficient. The bills passed 109-1 & 108-2.
18HB 40672-MarI voted no on HB 4067, which expands the list of advance trainings a dentist can receive in order to qualify for a “health profession specialty field license.” In conversations with local professionals it appears that many specialties are already permitted under state law, and if anything, I always have concerns over barriers to entry. The bill passed 108-2.
19-21HB 4047-40493-MarI voted yes on the House Concurrence to the supplemental budget recently passed by the Senate. The supplemental budget includes dollars for vaccine distribution, afflicted businesses, and schools, among other categories. The total package spend is $4.25 billion. All $1.49 billion in federal title I dollars would be appropriated, however, $840 billion of the total is tie-barred to HB 4049. HB 4049 prohibits DHHS from closing schools or sports activities, instead local health departments may issue emergency orders if certain metrics are met within a 14-day period: the number of cases is above 55/1,000,000, the percentage of positive tests is above 10%, each health facility in the area maintains a surge capacity below 20% in admissions or transfers, COVID hospitalizations have increased by 25% or more, and each facility in the area does not have a minimum 14 day supply of PPE. Furthermore, HB 4047 includes an additional $347.3 million tie-barred to SB 1, which requires legislative approval of any extension of emergency orders issued by the director of DHHS. Here are other details of the plan, though not in full: •$150 million deposit into the unemployment trust fund ensures benefits for unemployed workers continue and helps offset the cost of fraudulent claims paid due to a lack of oversight from the Whitmer administration. •$55 million to ensure relief for local Michigan job providers currently facing higher unemployment system contribution costs. •$90.2 million with language that prohibits any state-imposed mandates for individuals to receive the vaccine. Language is included that requires the department to report on how they will distribute vaccines to local health department and enrolled providers, provide transparency for the development and testing of the vaccines •$415 million to help restaurants and other small businesses who lost revenue because of the governor’s severe and arbitrary COVID restrictions. •$38.5 million to reimburse fees for liquor licenses and health department inspections as local businesses struggle to reopen. •$22 million to assist job providers facing penalties and interest on 2020 summer or winter property taxes. •$165 million to help families with rent and utility relief. •$510 million for Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) benefits for families facing hunger.  •$135 million for a voluntary, in-person summer semester for K-8 to help kids recover from learning loss during the pandemic, plus a credit recovery option for high school students. An additional $15 million helps districts launch before-and-after school programs. •$21 million for teachers and support staff helping students catch up on learning over the summer. •$5.8 million to help families participating in summer school offset transportation, tutoring and other costs. •$22 million quarterly for closer monitoring and accountability in the governor’s troubled distribution plan. The state could not impose vaccination mandates. •$144 million for virus testing would be allocated quarterly, to improve oversight and efficiency. •$10 million is set aside to provide parents with $50 for enrolling their student in a summer program and up to $200 for transportation, tutoring, or other costs. Further, an additional $10 million is appropriated to a grant program for districts to compete for an additional $100 per pupil to implement innovative summer semester programs for K-8 students or credit recovery programs for 9-12 graders. There is also an additional $20 million for student mental health needs. •There is an additional $136 million in School Aid Fund that would be added to ensure that each district would receive the equivalent of $450/pupil and is tied to schools offering 20 hours a week in-person instruction by March 22. I do not support every part of this supplemental budget, but our plan is a balanced and commonsense approach between the wants and desires of the Executive Branch and the Legislative Branch. The bills passed 85-25, 77-33, & 60-50.
22HB 42603-MarI voted yes on HB 4260, a school aid supplemental vehicle bill for fiscal year ’21. The bill passed unanimously.
23HB 40613-MarI voted yes on HB 4061, which restricts the use of the public alert system. The public alert system will no longer be allowed to be used to announce a new law or executive order, but instead will be used to include threats that are unforeseen and will likely lead to immediate or nearly immediate loss of life or property such as a natural disaster, train derailment, etc. Overusing the state’s emergency alert system is a serious mistake. It will diminish the overall effectiveness of the system. The bill passed 63-47.
24, 25HB 4224, 42253-MarI voted no on HB 4224 & 4225, which exempts the purchase of PPE equipment and cleaning supplies from sales and use tax for business activities. I do not believe in picking winners and losers through sales and use tax exemptions for specific products or businesses. These types of bills erode current tax revenues and inhibit growth in future revenues. The bills passed 104-6. 
26HB 41279-MarI voted yes on HB 4127, which creates a procedure to remove people from the Qualified Voter File (QVF) who have a placeholder date of birth. There are currently 230 people according to an Auditor General audit who are in the Qualified Voter File with an age of over 122 years old. This does not mean these residents are that age, but are rather a result of antiquated voter files being transferred to the QVF. The legislation would require the SOS to send a prepaid postage and preaddressed note as required by federal law to the 230 voters so that they can verify their date of birth. If the voter does not return the card or participate in any voter activity prior to the first business day after the second November general election from receipt of their notice, their registration will be cancelled. If a voter returns the notice, but their signature does not match the QVF, then the voter will be notified by their clerk and their registration record will be challenged until the discrepancy is remedied. The bill passed 61-48.
27HB 41289-MarI voted yes on HB 4128, which provides a procedure to remove people from the qualified voter file (qvf) if they have not voted in the last 20 years. The legislation would require the SOS to send the same notice as found in HB 4127, with the same requirements that their signature must match the QVF. The bill passed 66-43.
28HB 41299-MarI voted yes on HB 4129, which requires the SOS to post names of local clerks on their department website who have not completed required continuing education courses. A recent audit of the Bureau of Elections showed 21% of jurisdictions in Michigan were without fully accredited elections officials, and the legislature must ensure these officials are held accountable. The bill passed 87-22.
29HB 41309-MarI voted yes on HB 4130, which changes the due date of lobby reports from January 31st and August 31st to February 28th and September 30th. Currently, campaign finance and lobby reports have the same due date, therefore the Bureau of Elections cannot meet the statutory deadlines to properly review the reports. The bill passed unanimously.
30HB 41319-MarI voted yes on HB 4131, which grants the Bureau of Elections 30 days to review campaign finance reports instead of 4 days. 79% of campaign statements were not reviewed within 4 days but took on average 33 days. This bill will reflect current practice. The bill passed 108-1.
31HB 41349-MarI voted yes on HB 4134, which increases the allowable precinct size from 2,999 voters to 4,000 voters. Moreover, the bill requires city and township clerks to maintain a permanent absentee voter application list. This legislation will save municipalities dollars, poll workers, supplies, and materials. The bill passed 79-30.
32HB 41359-MarI voted yes on HB 4135, which requires voting jurisdictions with more than one precinct to utilize an absentee voter (av) counting board to count all absentee voter ballots. Last year’s election brought into question whether ballots can be counted in a timely manner. Currently, stacks of AV ballots are inserted into voting machines during lulls in the polling place. While this is an accepted practice, it gives off a wrong appearance. The legislature should continue to support legislation which promotes trust in our elections process. This bill would help to limit that practice. The bill passed 104-5.
33SB 19-MarI voted yes on SB 1, which requires the legislature to approve an extension of emergency orders issued by DHHS. DHHS orders would be valid for 28 days, after which they would be subject to legislative scrutiny. The legislature is a co-equal branch of government, and current law provides too much authority to one department under the executive branch. It is the duty and role of the legislature to represent the residents of Michigan, not one unelected department head. The bill passed 59-50.
34-37HB 4047, HB 4048 veto override9-MarI voted yes to override the Governor’s line item vetoes on House Bill 4047 & House Bill 4048. Remember, HB 4047 passed by a margin of 85-29. Furthermore, HB 4048 passed by a margin of 77-30. 73 yes votes are the required number of votes to override a veto. The Governor line item vetoed a $150 million deposit into the UIA Trust Fund, and even worse, $450 million to afflicted businesses. The $150 million covers the state’s share of payouts of fraudulent claims due to errors within the Unemployment Insurance Agency. The UIA Trust Fund is funded by businesses who pay into the funds, therefore, it is likely they will have to pay more in taxes. The bill even allowed for federal funds to replace state funds by May 1st. The veto override failed 64-45. (Original vote was 85-29 in support just six days ago). Moreover, the Governor line item vetoed $426 million to support afflicted businesses that lost revenue from closure in compliance with orders from DHHS and the Governor’s office. The $426 million could be used for property taxes, liquor licenses, or other fees. The state closed these businesses; thus, it is the responsibility of the state to assist these businesses and workers. Instead, the funds were vetoed, and the override failed by a margin of 66-43. (Original vote was 85-29). Neither of these line item supplementals were tie-barred to other bills or dealt with shifting power from the executive to the legislature or from DHHS to local health departments. I also voted yes to override the Governor’s line item vetoes on HB 4048. This included $21 million to support summer school efforts to make up for loss of learning time, among other legislative items. The veto overrides failed 64-45 & 65-44. (Original bill passed 77-30 – six days ago). Both of these bills passed on March 3rd with a greater than two-thirds majority (the threshold to override a veto). Nonetheless, all four of the veto overrides did not pass during yesterday’s session.
38, 39HB 4219, HB 422010-MarI voted yes on HB 4219 & 4220, the OWI expungement package. The legislation allows the court to set aside an operating while intoxicated first-offense, which is currently ineligible for expungement. The expungement is not eligible for automatic expungement but petition only. People who made mistakes are to be given a chance to clean up their public record. For many, this is a life-changer. We are correcting an injustice. The bills passed 93-17.
40HB 405310-MarI voted yes on HB 4053, to rename a portion of M-120 as the “Deputy Ernest W. Heikkila Memorial Highway.” Deputy Heikkila was killed in the line of duty when his cruiser was struck by another car. The bill passed 109-1.
41, 42, 43SB 29, 11410-MarI voted yes on SB 114 & SB 29, which formally restores the line items which were vetoed by the Governor. The bills passed 60-50 & 66-44.
44, 45HB 4308, 430910-MarI voted no on HB 4308 & 4309, which eliminates the sunset for .08 blood alcohol content (BAC). I do not believe we should permanently set in statute the .08 limit. Some studies believe the limit is too low, while others believe it is too high. Regardless, eliminating the sunset would make future efforts to reform the BAC limit more difficult. Furthermore, the limit of .08 is adopted by all fifty states to simply comply with the federal government to maintain highway funding. The bills passed 105-5.
46HB 404011-MarI voted no on HB 4040, which excludes apprenticeship or pre-apprenticeship programs as proprietary schools in order to obtain state and federal funds. I do not believe these programs should be excluded but should still follow the same requirements as proprietary schools. The bill passed 107-3.
47HB 412216-MarI voted yes on HB 4122, which would reform the county veteran service grants. The bill would make technical changes to the program to ensure equitable distribution of dollars if the full $50,000 per county is unavailable for distribution. The bill passed 108-1.
48, 49SB 29, 11417-MarI voted yes to concur in Senate changes on SB 114 and SB 2, supplementals for school aid and economic relief. The Senate added in book-closing transfers for fiscal year 20 that were not able to be accomplished last year, such as transferring $100,000 in available general funds from the Standards and Training/Justice Training Grants line item to the Public Safety Officers Benefit Program line item. The bills passed 60-49 & 64-45.
50, 51HB 4171, HB 417217-MarI voted no on HB 4171 and 4172, which expands the eligibility for the first responder presumed coverage fund. This legislation will open the fund to more claims, and hence, will increase costs. It is possible that the expansion in eligibility will raise costs beyond what the fund can absorb. I also believe we should have more discussion on presumption of causes. Studies show that firefighters are at a tremendous risk of cancer as opposed to the average American, however, there are instances where cancers developed by firefighters may not have been the result of their job. The bills passed 106-3.
52HB 421017-MarI voted no on HB 4210, which exempts certain broadband equipment from property taxes. A broadband company must resolve a lack of broadband service, reach certain upload and download speeds, among other things. Nevertheless, I have consistently opposed targeted tax breaks to specific industries or companies.  I do not believe it is the role of government to pick winners and losers through our tax code; our tax system is already incredibly complex, and specific exemptions only make the system more confusing. Furthermore, targeted exemptions mostly harm local governments. The bill passed 59-50.
53SB 18617-MarI voted yes on SB 186, which places Michigan’s industrial hemp program into compliance with finalized USDA rules. The legislature voted yes last term to correspond our hemp program to interim USDA rules, but now there was a need to update various parts of our state operated program. Many of the changes are highly technical, such as changing the registration and license cycle to February 1st through January 31st from the current December 1st through November 1st cycle. The bill passed 108-1.
54HB 446917-MarI voted yes on HB 4469, which included the most recent list of approved projects supported by the revenues of the Michigan Natural Resources Trust Fund. The revenues in the Michigan Natural Resources Trust Fund are derived from the development of state owned-mineral resources. This is a yearly bill as required by Michigan’s Constitution. For anyone interested, Section 35 of Article IX discusses the MNRTF. Moreover, this years MNRTF included dollars to go toward the Lost Lake Nature Park expansion. The bill passed 104-5.
55HB 411518-MarI voted yes on HB 4115, which allows local units of governments to extend the allowable hours for selling alcohol from 2 a.m. to 4 a.m. I still disagree with the license fee included in the bill (my reasoning for voting no last term), but there has been unprecedented hardships endured by local businesses over the last year. The legislature needs to do all we can to assist struggling businesses, and even if one disagrees with the allowable hours in the bill, it will still be up to determination of local governments. The bill passed 61-47.
56SB 10018-MarI voted yes on SB 100, which adds “foster care” as a defined term in the section of the Child Caring Institutions Act. This bill is very technical, but the reasoning for this addition of language is to comply with changes made to the Family First Prevention Services as part of the 2018 federal budget act. Moreover, the simple change ensures that children who need to be placed in residential facilities are still able to do so without risking losing federal funds. The bill passed unanimously.
57-66HB 4383-439218-MarI voted yes on House Bills 4383-4392, which subjects the legislature and governor to FOIA. The Center for Public Integrity ranks Michigan 50th in the nation for transparency. These bills will make state government more accountable to the people of Michigan. All bills passed unanimously.
67HB 405024-MarI voted no on HB 4050, which will allow the DNR to exempt certain specific location of game species from any FOIA request. I am weary of voting yes on any FOIA exemptions when it has been a goal of the legislature to do the exact opposite. Not to mention that the current practice of FOIA for game species is very rare. The bill passed 91-16.
68HB 412324-MarI voted no on HB 4123, which would allow for municipalities to finance any wastewater and drinking water projects utilizing energy performance contracting under the state’s revolving loan fund. Although the fund has been fiscally secure, I am concerned about any increases in eligibility to the fund and any potential and unforeseen costs. Furthermore, to qualify, the projects must meet the definitions already defined in Michigan’s performance contracting statutes. Therefore, I am concerned about some areas being able to meet the definitions easier than others, and thus, creating a winner and loser system among municipalities. The bill 104-3.
69HB 436324-MarI voted yes on HB 4363, which extends the time from 180 days to 210 days for the DNR to approve or deny an application for a proposed sale of surplus land. This will give the public more time to weigh in on any proposals. The bill passed 105-3.
70HB 434824-MarI voted no on HB 4348, which requires pharmacy benefit managers to have a Michigan license. The bill will also require PBM’s to provide the Legislature with annual reports, create uniformity in pharmacy reimbursements, among other details. The bill passed 97-10.
71HB 435024-MarI voted no on HB 4350, which only allows for rebates to be applied if the rebate is not for a drug with a lower-cost generic equivalent. The motive behind the bill is to try and prevent pharmacy benefit managers from steering consumers to certain drugs, but I believe this will be unnecessary with the bills yet to be voted on (coming soon) which will deal with gag clauses and ensuring that consumers can be directed by pharmacists to more cost-effective medicine. The bill passed 101-6.
72HB 435324-MarI voted no on HB 4353, which allows for copay coupons to go toward the consumers’ out-of-pocket maximum. These coupons are a problem and actually are barred by Medicare, Medicaid, and VA, because they serve as an economic inducement. This will likely raise insurance costs. The bill passed 98-9.
73HB 434624-MarI voted no on HB 4346, which limits the monthly price cap on prescription insulin to $50 for each 30-day supply. The bill is well intentioned but a mandate on the health insurers will not get to the root of the problem. There are 3 manufacturers who control the majority of the insulin market with no robust generic market, which has kept prices high. This may place a $50 cap on what your insurance company can charge, but the manufacturer drug prices will likely increase. Therefore, your health insurance company will raise their costs and find other ways to make up for any financial losses. Furthermore, patients enrolled in Medicare, Medicaid, Veterans Affairs, ERISA, or the uninsured, will not see any assistance from the legislation. The bill passed 91-16.
74HB 435624-MarI voted yes on HB 4356, which allows consumers to use an online or mobile platform to renew their contact prescriptions if their prescription hasn’t changed in the past five years. The bill passed 56-51.
75, 76HB 4351, 435224-MarI voted yes on HB 4351 & 4352, which Prohibits an insurer from requiring a patient to pay a higher co-pay than the cost of the dispensed medication and bans pharmacy benefit managers from prohibiting a pharmacy from disclosing the current price of a medication. The bills passed 106-1.
77HB 434524-MarI voted yes on HB 4345, which requires insurers to count out-of-network prescriptions toward any out-of-pocket maximum if the cost of the drug is less than the average cost of an in-network pharmacy drug. This bill should drive costs down and will allow for cheaper drugs to be more easily purchased by families. The bill passed 100-7.
78HB 435524-MarI voted yes on HB 4355, which allows out-of-state providers to provide telehealth services in Michigan. The bill passed 56-51.
79HB 435724-MarI voted no on HB 4357, which prohibits drug manufacturers from giving gifts to prescribers worth more than $63. Part of the high cost of health care are consumers being prescribed drugs partly based on the relationship between prescriber and manufacturer. Nevertheless, this is an attempt to legislate morality. An immoral manufacturer and prescriber will still find a way around the bill and I have doubts this will actually help to lower the cost of healthcare, and if anything, this is the government mandating the terms of a relationship between two industries. The bill passed 102-5.
80HB 435424-MarI voted no on HB 4354, which would cap the coinsurance or copay for oral chemo at $150 per 30-day supply. This was a difficult bill as I have heard from residents on many sides of the issue. My no vote is very similar to my no vote on HB 4346. This legislation would not impact patients with ERISA, Medicare, Medicaid, and the uninsured. Moreover, it does not address the underlying issue of the high prices charged by pharmaceutical companies. This is another instance where your insurer will simply make up the cost in another way, likely by raising costs. The bill passed 91-15.
81HB 435924-MarI voted yes on HB 4359, which expands the scope of practice for Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists (CRNA’s) to improve access to safe anesthesia services in Michigan. HB 4359 allows CRNAs to practice in any of the following settings: A hospital inpatient or outpatient facility; A freestanding surgical center; An office of a physician, podiatrist, or dentist; and any other office or facility in which diagnostic or therapeutic procedures are provided to a patient. The bill passed 82-25.
82HB 434724-MarI voted no on HB 4347, which requires manufacturers to submit information to the Department of Insurance when they increase the wholesale acquisition cost of prescription drugs by more than 15% in a given year. I have concerns over the State of Michigan instituting stricter rules than the federal government, furthermore, this may lead to state bureaucrats deciding on what drug costs are acceptable and which ones aren’t. The bill passed 100-7.
83HB 435824-MarI voted no on HB 4358, which prohibits an insurer from removing a prescription drug within a plan year. This will place limitations on formulary changes which would restrict a health plan’s ability to manage them in a cost-effective and consumer-focused way. The bill passed 99-8.
84HB 434924-MarI voted yes on HB 4349, which requires hospitals to post a copy of their charge descriptions online. The bill passed 104-3.
85HB 401424-MarI voted no on HB 4014, which requires speed limits to be rounded to the nearest multiple of five miles an hour that is within five miles an hour of the 85th percentile speed. In most cases, the result of these changes will be minimal but may lead to lower or higher speeds in some areas than are expected by drivers. The bill passed 94-13.
86, 87HB 4211/421224-MarI voted no on HB 4211 & 4212, which would increase the penalties for forcefully disarming a law enforcement officer. Anyone looking to forcefully take an officer’s weapon is not going to be discouraged when confronted with a 20 year prison sentence instead of a 10 year prison sentence. I do not believe this bill will serve as a deterrent. The bills passed 100-7.
88HB 442924-MarI voted yes on HB 4429, which designates a portion of highways US-2 and US-41 in Delta County as “Darryl M. Rantanen Memorial Highway.” Trooper Rantanen was killed in the line of duty while pursuing a stolen vehicle. The bill passed 106-1.
89SB 4625-MarI voted no on SB 46, the Senate companion bill of HB 4210, which exempts certain broadband equipment from property taxes. A broadband company must resolve a lack of broadband service, reach certain upload and download speeds, among other things. Nevertheless, I have consistently opposed targeted tax breaks to specific industries or companies. I do not believe it is the role of government to pick winners and losers through our tax code; our tax system is already incredibly complex, and specific exemptions only make the system more confusing. Furthermore, targeted exemptions mostly harm local governments. The bill passed 57-49.
90HB 402625-MarI voted yes on HB 4026, which creates an option to purchase a two-year recreational passport for individuals who obtain a two-year vehicle registration (HB 4117). The bill passed unanimously.
91HB 411725-MarI voted yes on HB 4117, which creates an option for a two-year vehicle registration. The bill passed unanimously.
92-94HB 4243-424525-MarI voted yes on HB 4243-4245, which amends penalties and sentencing guidelines for the manufacturing, delivering, or possessing with intent to deliver a schedule 1 or 2 controlled substance. Current law includes fentanyl sentencing guidelines being grouped with other schedule 1 or 2 controlled substances. This package maintains strict guidelines for manufacturing, delivering, or possessing fentanyl or other derivatives, but lessens the guidelines regarding others. An example is the manufacturing of 50 grams or more, but less than 450 grams, of any mixture containing a schedule 1 or 2 controlled substance. The current penalty is a felony punishable by not more than 20 years, and under this package the penalty would be reduced to not more than 10 years (unless the controlled substance is fentanyl or any derivative). This package has a lot of details, but in short, will start to reform our outdated drug sentencing laws. The bills passed 103-3, 102-4, & 104-2.
95HB 403525-MarI voted yes on HB 4035, which requires the DNR to pay their share of lake level assessments on state-owned lands when invoiced without requiring local governments to file a lawsuit for reimbursement. The bill passed unanimously.
96HB 402225-MarI voted yes on HB 4022, which requires DTMB to list state employee’s salary information to their website. The information will include position title, classified or non-classified civil service distinction, salary, and benefits information. The bill passed 79-27.
97, 98HB 4376, 437725-MarI voted yes on HB 4376 and 4377, which waives licensing fees for veterans and military service members and their dependents who hold an out-of-state license. I believe this is a great first step to waiving out-of-state licensing fees for non-military members. The bills passed unanimously.
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